Category Added in a WPeMatico Campaign

New – Bring ML Models Built Anywhere into Amazon SageMaker Canvas and Generate Predictions | Amazon Web Services

Amazon SageMaker Canvas provides business analysts with a visual interface to solve business problems using machine learning (ML) without writing a single line of code. Since we introduced SageMaker Canvas in 2021, many users have asked us for an enhanced, seamless collaboration experience that enables data scientists to share trained models with their business analysts with a few simple clicks.

Today, I’m excited to announce that you can now bring ML models built anywhere into SageMaker Canvas and generate predictions.

New – Bring Your Own Model into SageMaker Canvas
As a data scientist or ML practitioner, you can now seamlessly share models built anywhere, within or outside Amazon SageMaker, with your business teams. This removes the heavy lifting for your engineering teams to build a separate tool or user interface to share ML models and collaborate between the different parts of your organization. As a business analyst, you can now leverage ML models shared by your data scientists within minutes to generate predictions.

Let me show you how this works in practice!

In this example, I share an ML model that has been trained to identify customers that are potentially at risk of churning with my marketing analyst. First, I register the model in the SageMaker model registry. SageMaker model registry lets you catalog models and manage model versions. I create a model group called 2022-customer-churn-model-group and then select Create model version to register my model.

To register your model, provide the location of the inference image in Amazon ECR, as well as the location of your model.tar.gz file in Amazon S3. You can also add model endpoint recommendations and additional model information. Once you’ve registered your model, select the model version and select Share.

You can now choose the SageMaker Canvas user profile(s) within the same SageMaker domain you want to share your model with. Then, provide additional model details, such as information about training and validation datasets, the ML problem type, and model output information. You can also add a note for the SageMaker Canvas users you share the model with.

Similarly, you can now also share models trained in SageMaker Autopilot and models available in SageMaker JumpStart with SageMaker Canvas users.

The business analysts will receive an in-app notification in SageMaker Canvas that a model has been shared with them, along with any notes you added.

My marketing analyst can now open, analyze, and start using the model to generate ML predictions in SageMaker Canvas.

Select Batch prediction to generate ML predictions for an entire dataset or Single prediction to create predictions for a single input. You can download the results in a .csv file.

New – Improved Model Sharing and Collaboration from SageMaker Canvas with SageMaker Studio Users
We also improved the sharing and collaboration capabilities from SageMaker Canvas with data science and ML teams. As a business analyst, you can now select which SageMaker Studio user profile(s) you want to share your standard-build models with.

Your data scientists or ML practitioners will receive a similar in-app notification in SageMaker Studio once a model has been shared with them, along with any notes from you. In addition to just reviewing the model, SageMaker Studio users can now also, if needed, update the data transformations in SageMaker Data Wrangler, retrain the model in SageMaker Autopilot, and share back the updated model. SageMaker Studio users can also recommend an alternate model from the list of models in SageMaker Autopilot.

Once SageMaker Studio users share back a model, you receive another notification in SageMaker Canvas that an updated model has been shared back with you. This collaboration between business analysts and data scientists will help democratize ML across organizations by bringing transparency to automated decisions, building trust, and accelerating ML deployments.

Now Available
The enhanced, seamless collaboration capabilities for Amazon SageMaker Canvas, including the ability to bring your ML models built anywhere, are available today in all AWS Regions where SageMaker Canvas is available with no changes to the existing SageMaker Canvas pricing.

Start collaborating and bring your ML model to Amazon SageMaker Canvas today!

— Antje

Heads-Up: Amazon S3 Security Changes Are Coming in April of 2023 | Amazon Web Services

Starting in April of 2023 we will be making two changes to Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) to put our latest best practices for bucket security into effect automatically. The changes will begin to go into effect in April and will be rolled out to all AWS Regions within weeks.

Once the changes are in effect for a target Region, all newly created buckets in the Region will by default have S3 Block Public Access enabled and access control lists (ACLs) disabled. Both of these options are already console defaults and have long been recommended as best practices. The options will become the default for buckets that are created using the S3 API, S3 CLI, the AWS SDKs, or AWS CloudFormation templates.

As a bit of history, S3 buckets and objects have always been private by default. We added Block Public Access in 2018 and the ability to disable ACLs in 2021 in order to give you more control, and have long been recommending the use of AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) policies as a modern and more flexible alternative.

In light of this change, we recommend a deliberate and thoughtful approach to the creation of new buckets that rely on public buckets or ACLs, and believe that most applications do not need either one. If your application turns out be one that does, then you will need to make the changes that I outline below (be sure to review your code, scripts, AWS CloudFormation templates, and any other automation).

What’s Changing
Let’s take a closer look at the changes that we are making:

S3 Block Public Access – All four of the bucket-level settings described in this post will be enabled for newly created buckets:

A subsequent attempt to set a bucket policy or an access point policy that grants public access will be rejected with a 403 Access Denied error. If you need public access for a new bucket you can create it as usual and then delete the public access block by calling DeletePublicAccessBlock (you will need s3:PutBucketPublicAccessBlock permission in order to call this function; read Block Public Access to learn more about the functions and the permissions).

ACLs Disabled – The Bucket owner enforced setting will be enabled for newly created buckets, making bucket ACLs and object ACLs ineffective, and ensuring that the bucket owner is the object owner no matter who uploads the object. If you want to enable ACLs for a bucket, you can set the ObjectOwnership parameter to ObjectWriter in your CreateBucket request or you can call DeleteBucketOwnershipControls after you create the bucket. You will need s3:PutBucketOwnershipControls permission in order to use the parameter or to call the function; read Controlling Ownership of Objects and Creating a Bucket to learn more.

Stay Tuned
We will publish an initial What’s New post when we start to deploy this change and another one when the deployment has reached all AWS Regions. You can also run your own tests to detect the change in behavior.

Jeff;

AWS Week in Review – December 12, 2022 | Amazon Web Services

This post is part of our Week in Review series. Check back each week for a quick roundup of interesting news and announcements from AWS!

The world is asynchronous, is what Werner Vogels, Amazon CTO, reminded us during his keynote last week at AWS re:Invent. At the beginning of the keynote, he showed us how weird a synchronous world would be and how everything in nature is asynchronous. One example of an event-driven application he showcased during his keynote is Serverlesspresso, a project my team has been working on for the last year. And last week, we announced Serverlesspresso extensions, a new program that lets you contribute to Serverlesspresso and learn how event-driven applications can be extended.

Last Week’s Launches
Here are some launches that got my attention during the previous week.

Amazon SageMaker Studio now supports fine-grained data access control with AWS LakeFormation when accessing data through Amazon EMR. Now, when you connect to EMR clusters to SageMaker Studio notebooks, you can choose what runtime IAM role you want to connect with, and the notebooks will only access data and resources permitted by the attached runtime role.

Amazon Lex has now added support for Arabic, Cantonese, Norwegian, Swedish, Polish, and Finnish. This opens new possibilities to create chat bots and conversational experiences in more languages.

Amazon RDS Proxy now supports creating proxies in Amazon Aurora Global Database primary and secondary Regions. Now, building multi-Region applications with Amazon Aurora is simpler. RDS proxy sits between your application and the database pool and shares established database connections.

Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP launched many new features. First, it added the support for Nitro-based encryption of data in transit. It also extended NVMe read cache support to Single-AZ file systems. And it added four new features to ease the use of the service: easily assign a snapshot policy to your volumes, easily create data protection volumes, configure volumes so their tags are automatically copied to the backups, and finally, add or remove VPC route tables for your existing Multi-AZ file systems.

I would also like to mention two launches that happened before re:Invent but were not covered on the News Blog:

Amazon EventBridge Scheduler is a new capability from Amazon EventBridge that allows you to create, run, and manage scheduled tasks at scale. Using this new capability, you can schedule one-time or recurrent tasks across 270 AWS services.

AWS IoT RoboRunner is now generally available. Last year at re:Invent Channy wrote a blog post introducing the preview for this service. IoT RoboRunner is a robotic service that makes it easier to build and deploy applications for fleets of robots working seamlessly together.

For a full list of AWS announcements, be sure to keep an eye on the What’s New at AWS page.

Other AWS News
Some other updates and news that you may have missed:

I would like to recommend this really interesting Amazon Science article about federated learning. This is a framework that allows edge devices to work together to train a global model while keeping customers’ data on-device.

Podcast Charlas Técnicas de AWS – If you understand Spanish, this podcast is for you. Podcast Charlas Técnicas is one of the official AWS podcasts in Spanish, and every other week there is a new episode. Today the final episode for season three launched, and in it, we discussed many of the re:Invent launches. You can listen to all the episodes directly from your favorite podcast app or at AWS Podcasts en español.

AWS open-source news and updates–This is a newsletter curated by my colleague Ricardo to bring you the latest open-source projects, posts, events, and more.

Upcoming AWS Events
Check your calendars and sign up for these AWS events:

AWS Resiliency Hub Activation Day is a half-day technical virtual session to deep dive into the features and functionality of Resiliency Hub. You can register for free here.

AWS re:Invent recaps in your area. During the re:Invent week, we had lots of new announcements, and in the next weeks you can find in your area a recap of all these launches. All the events will be posted on this site, so check it regularly to find an event nearby.

AWS re:Invent keynotes, leadership sessions, and breakout sessions are available on demand. I recommend that you check the playlists and find the talks about your favorite topics in one collection.

That’s all for this week. Check back next Monday for another Week in Review!

— Marcia

New – Process PDFs, Word Documents, and Images with Amazon Comprehend for IDP | Amazon Web Services

Today we are announcing a new Amazon Comprehend feature for intelligent document processing (IDP). This feature allows you to classify and extract entities from PDF documents, Microsoft Word files, and images directly from Amazon Comprehend without you needing to extract the text first.

Many customers need to process documents that have a semi-structured format, like images of receipts that were scanned or tax statements in PDF format. Until today, those customers first needed to preprocess those documents to flatten them into machine-readable text, which can reduce the quality of the document context. Then they could use Amazon Comprehend to classify and extract entities from those preprocessed files.

Now with Amazon Comprehend for IDP, customers can process their semi-structured documents, such as PDFs, docx, PNG, JPG, or TIFF images, as well as plain-text documents, with a single API call. This new feature combines OCR and Amazon Comprehend’s existing natural language processing (NLP) capabilities to classify and extract entities from the documents. The custom document classification API allows you to organize documents into categories or classes, and the custom-named entity recognition API allows you to extract entities from documents like product codes or business-specific entities. For example, an insurance company can now process scanned customers’ claims with fewer API calls. Using the Amazon Comprehend entity recognition API, they can extract the customer number from the claims and use the custom classifier API to sort the claim into the different insurance categories—home, car, or personal.

Starting today, Amazon Comprehend for IDP APIs are available for real-time inferencing of files, as well as for asynchronous batch processing on large document sets. This feature simplifies the document processing pipeline and reduces development effort.

Getting Started
You can use Amazon Comprehend for IDP from the AWS Management Console, AWS SDKs, or AWS Command Line Interface (CLI).

In this demo, you will see how to asynchronously process a semi-structured file with a custom classifier. For extracting entities, the steps are different, and you can learn how to do it by checking the documentation.

In order to process a file with a classifier, you will first need to train a custom classifier. You can follow the steps in the Amazon Comprehend Developer Guide. You need to train this classifier with plain text data.

After you train your custom classifier, you can classify documents using either asynchronous or synchronous operations. For using the synchronous operation to analyze a single document, you need to create an endpoint to run real-time analysis using a custom model. You can find more information about real-time analysis in the documentation. For this demo, you are going to use the asynchronous operation, placing the documents to classify in an Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) bucket and running an analysis batch job.

To get started classifying documents in batch from the console, on the Amazon Comprehend page, go to Analysis jobs and then Create job.

Then you can configure the new analysis job. First, input a name and pick Custom classification and the custom classifier you created earlier.

Then you can configure the input data. First, select the S3 location for that data. In that location, you can place your PDFs, images, and Word Documents. Because you are processing semi-structured documents, you need to choose One document per file. If you want to override Amazon Comprehend settings for extracting and parsing the document, you can configure the Advanced document input options.

After configuring the input data, you can select where the output of this analysis should be stored. Also, you need to give access permissions for this analysis job to read and write on the specified Amazon S3 locations, and then you are ready to create the job.

The job takes a few minutes to run, depending on the size of the input. When the job is ready, you can check the output results. You can find the results in the Amazon S3 location you specified when you created the job.

In the results folder, you will find a .out file for each of the semi-structured files Amazon Comprehend classified. The .out file is a JSON, in which each line represents a page of the document. In the amazon-textract-output directory, you will find a folder for each classified file, and inside that folder, there is one file per page from the original file. Those page files contain the classification results. To learn more about the outputs of the classifications, check the documentation page.

Available Now
You can get started classifying and extracting entities from semi-structured files like PDFs, images, and Word Documents asynchronously and synchronously today from Amazon Comprehend in all the Regions where Amazon Comprehend is available. Learn more about this new launch in the Amazon Comprehend Developer Guide.

Marcia

Introducing Amazon GameLift Anywhere – Run Your Game Servers on Your Own Infrastructure | Amazon Web Services

In 2016, we launched Amazon GameLift, a dedicated hosting solution that securely deploys and automatically scales fleets of session-based multiplayer game servers to meet worldwide player demand.

With Amazon GameLift, you can create and upload a game server build once, replicate, and then deploy across multiple AWS Regions and AWS Local Zones to reach your players with low-latency experiences across the world. GameLift also includes standalone features for low-cost game fleets with GameLift FleetIQ and player matchmaking with GameLift FlexMatch.

Game developers asked us to reduce the wait time to deploy a candidate server build to the cloud each time they needed to test and iterate their game during the development phase. In addition, our customers told us that they often have ongoing bare-metal contracts or on-premises game servers and want the flexibility to use their existing infrastructure with cloud servers.

Today we are announcing the general availability of Amazon GameLift Anywhere, which decouples game session management from the underlying compute resources. With this new release, you can now register and deploy any hardware, including your own local workstations, under a logical construct called an Anywhere Fleet.

Because your local hardware can now be a GameLift-managed server, you can iterate on the server build in your familiar local desktop environment, and any server error can materialize in seconds. You can also set breakpoints in your environment’s debugger, thereby eliminating trial and error and further speeding up the iteration process.

Here are the major benefits for game developers to use GameLift Anywhere.

  • Faster game development – Instantly test and iterate on your local workstation while still leveraging GameLift FlexMatch and Queue services.
  • Hybrid server management – Deploy, operate, and scale dedicated game servers hosted in the cloud or on-premises, all from a single location.
  • Streamline server operations – Reduce cost and operational complexity by unifying server infrastructure under a single game server orchestration layer.

During the beta period of GameLift Anywhere, lots of customers gave feedback. For example, Nitro Games has been an Amazon GameLift customer since 2020 and have used the service for player matchmaking and managing dedicated game servers in the cloud. Daniel Liljeqvist, Senior DevOps Engineer at Nitro Games said “With GameLift Anywhere we can easily debug a game server on our local machine, saving us time and making the feedback loop much shorter when we are developing new games and features.”

GameLift Anywhere resources such as locations, fleets, and compute are managed through the same highly secure AWS API endpoints as all AWS services. This also applies to generating the authentication tokens for game server processes that are only valid for a limited amount of time for additional security. You can leverage AWS Identity and Access Management (AWS IAM) roles and policies to fully manage access to all the GameLift Anywhere endpoints.

Getting Started with GameLift Anywhere
Before creating your GameLift fleet in your local hardware, you can create custom locations to run your game builds or scripts. Choose Locations in the left navigation pane of the GameLift console and select Create location.

You can create a custom location of your hardware that you can use with your GameLift Anywhere fleet to test your games.

Choose Fleets from the left navigation pane, then choose Create fleet to add your GameLift Anywhere fleet in the desired location.

Choose Anywhere on the Choose compute type step.

Define your fleet details, such as a fleet name and optional items. For more information on settings, see Create a new GameLift fleet in the AWS documentation.

On the Select locations step, select the custom location that you created. The home AWS Region is automatically selected as the Region you are creating the fleet in. You can use the home Region to access and use your resources.

After completing the fleet creation steps to create your Anywhere fleet, you can see active fleets in both the managed EC2 instances and the Anywhere location. You also can integrate remote on-premises hardware by adding more GameLift Anywhere locations, so you can manage your game sessions from one place. To learn more, see Create a new GameLift fleet in the AWS documentation.

You can register your laptop as a compute resource in the fleet that you created. Use the fleet-id created in the previous step and add a compute-name and your laptop’s ip-address.

$ aws gamelift register-compute 
    --compute-name ChannyDevLaptop 
    --fleet-id fleet-12345678-abcdefghi 
    --ip-address 10.1.2.3

Now, you can start a debug session of your game server by retrieving the authorization token for your laptop in the fleet that you created.

$ aws gamelift get-compute-auth-token 
    --fleet-id fleet-12345678-abcdefghi 
    --compute-name ChannyDevLaptop

To run a debug instance of your game server executable, your game server must call InitSDK(). After the process is ready to host a game session, the game server calls ProcessReady(). To learn more, see Integrating games with custom game servers and Testing your integration in the AWS documentation.

Now Available
Amazon GameLift Anywhere is available in all Regions where Amazon GameLift is available.  GameLift offers a step-by-step developer guide, API reference guide, and GameLift SDKs. You can also see for yourself how easy it is to test Amazon GameLift using our sample game to get started.

Give it a try, and please send feedback to AWS re:Post for Amazon GameLift or through your usual AWS support contacts.

Channy

Announcing Amazon CodeCatalyst, a Unified Software Development Service (Preview) | Amazon Web Services

Today, we announced the preview release of Amazon CodeCatalyst. A unified software development and delivery service, Amazon CodeCatalyst enables software development teams to quickly and easily plan, develop, collaborate on, build, and deliver applications on AWS, reducing friction throughout the development lifecycle.

In my time as a developer the biggest excitement—besides shipping software to users—was the start of a new project, or being invited to join a project. Both came with the anticipation of building something cool, cutting new code—seeing an idea come to life. However, starting out was sometimes a slow process. My team or I would need to update our local development environments—or entirely new machines—with tools, libraries, and programming frameworks. We had to create source code repositories and set up other shared tools such as Jira, Confluence, or Jenkins, configure build pipelines and other automation workflows, create test environments, and so on. Day-to-day maintenance of development and build environments consumed valuable team cycles and energy. Collaboration between the team took effort, too, because tools to share information and have a single source of truth were not available. Context switching between projects and dealing with conflicting dependencies in those projects, e.g., Python 3.6 for project X and Python 2.7 for project Y—especially when we had only a single machine to work on—further increased the burden.

It doesn’t seem to have gotten any better! These days, when talking to developers about their experiences, I often hear them express that they feel modern development has become even more complicated. This is due to having to select and configure a wider collection of modern frameworks and libraries, tools, cloud services, continuous integration and delivery pipelines, and many other choices that all need to work together to deliver the application experience. What was once manageable by one developer on one machine is now a sprawling, dynamic, complex net of decisions and tradeoffs, made even more challenging by the need to coordinate all this across dispersed teams.

Enter Amazon CodeCatalyst
I’ve spent some time talking with the team behind Amazon CodeCatalyst about their sources of inspiration and goals. Taking feedback from both new and experienced developers and service teams here at AWS, they examined the challenges typically experienced by teams and individual developers when building software for the cloud. Having gathered and reviewed this feedback, they set about creating a unified tool that smooths out the rough edges that needlessly slow down software delivery, and they added features to make it easier for teams to work together and collaborate. Features in Amazon CodeCatalyst to address these challenges include:

  • Blueprints that set up the project’s resources—not just scaffolding for new projects, but also the resources needed to support software delivery and deployment.
  • On-demand cloud-based Dev Environments, to make it easy to replicate consistent development environments for you or your teams.
  • Issue management, enabling tracing of changes across commits, pull requests, and deployments.
  • Automated build and release (CI/CD) pipelines using flexible, managed build infrastructure.
  • Dashboards to surface a feed of project activities such as commits, pull requests, and test reporting.
  • The ability to invite others to collaborate on a project with just an email.
  • Unified search, making it easy to find what you’re looking for across users, issues, code and other project resources.

There’s a lot in Amazon CodeCatalyst that I don’t have space to cover in this post, so I’m going to briefly cover some specific features, like blueprints, Dev Environments, and project collaboration. Other upcoming posts will cover additional features.

Project Blueprints
When I first heard about blueprints, they sounded like a feature to scaffold some initial code for a project. However, they’re much more! Parameterized application blueprints enable you to set up shared project resources to support the application development lifecycle and team collaboration in minutes—not just initial starter code for an application. The resources that a blueprint creates for a project include a source code repository, complete with initial sample code and AWS service configuration for popular application patterns, which follow AWS best practices by default. If you prefer, an external Git repository such as GitHub may be used instead. The blueprint can also add an issue tracker, but external trackers such as Jira can also be used. Then, the blueprint adds a build and release pipeline for CI/CD, which I’ll come to shortly, as well as other integrated tooling.

The project resources and integrated tools set up using blueprints, including the CI/CD pipeline and the AWS resources to host your application, make it so that you can press “deploy” and get sample code running in a few minutes, enabling you to jump right in and start working on your specific business logic.

At launch, customers can choose from blueprints with Typescript, Python, Java, .NET, Javascript for languages and React, Angular, and Vue frameworks, with more to come. And you don’t need to start with a blueprint. You can build projects with workflows that run on anything that works with Linux and Windows operating systems.

Cloud-Based Dev Environments
Development teams can often run into a problem of “environment drift” where one team member has a slightly different version of a toolchain or library compared to everyone else or the test environments. This can introduce subtle bugs that might go unnoticed for some time. Dev Environment specifications, and the other shared resources, that blueprints create help ensure there’s no unnecessary variance, and everyone on the team gets the same setup to provide a consistent, repeatable experience between developers.

Amazon CodeCatalyst uses a devfile to define the configuration of an on-demand, cloud-based Dev Environment, which currently supports four resizable instance size options with 2, 4, 8, or 16 vCPUs. The devfile defines and configures all of the resources needed to code, test, and debug for a given project, minimizing the time the development team members need to spend on creating and maintaining their local development environments. Devfiles, which are added to the source code repository by the selected blueprint can also be modified if required. With Dev Environments, context switching between projects incurs less overhead—with one click, you can simply switch to a different environment, and you’re ready to start working. This means you’re easily able to work concurrently on multiple codebases without reconfiguring. Being on-demand, Dev Environments can also be paused, restarted, or deleted as needed.

Below is an example of a devfile that bootstraps a Dev Environment.

schemaVersion: 2.0.0
metadata:
  name: aws-universal
  version: 1.0.1
  displayName: AWS Universal
  description: Stack with AWS Universal Tooling
  tags:
    - aws
    - a12
  projectType: aws
commands:
  - id: npm_install
    exec:
      component: aws-runtime
      commandLine: "npm install"
      workingDir: /projects/spa-app
events:
  postStart:
    - npm_install
components:
  - name: aws-runtime
    container:
      image: public.ecr.aws/aws-mde/universal-image:latest
      mountSources: true
      volumeMounts:
        - name: docker-store
          path: /var/lib/docker
  - name: docker-store
    volume:
      size: 16Gi

Developers working in cloud-based Dev Environments provisioned by Amazon CodeCatalyst can use AWS Cloud9 as their IDE. However, they can just as easily work with Amazon CodeCatalyst from other IDEs on their local machines, such as JetBrains IntelliJ IDEA Ultimate, PyCharm Pro, GoLand, and Visual Studio Code. Developers can also create Dev Environments from within their IDE, such as Visual Studio Code or for JetBrains using the JetBrains Gateway app. Below, JetBrains IntelliJ is being used.

Build and Release Pipelines
The build and release pipeline created by the blueprint run on flexible, managed infrastructure. The pipelines can use on-demand compute or preprovisioned builds, including a choice of machine sizes, and you can bring your own container environments. You can incorporate build actions that are built in or provided by partners (e.g., Mend, which provides a software composition analysis build action), and you can also incorporate GitHub Actions to compose fully automated pipelines. Pipelines are configurable using either a visual editor or YAML files.

Build and release pipelines enable deployment to popular AWS services, including Amazon Elastic Container Service (Amazon ECS), AWS Lambda, and Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2). Amazon CodeCatalyst makes it trivial to set up test and production environments and deploy using pipelines to one or many Regions or even multiple accounts for security.

Project Collaboration
As a unified software development service, Amazon CodeCatalyst not only makes it easier to get started building and delivering applications on AWS, it helps developers of all levels collaborate on projects through a single shared project space and source of truth. Developers can be invited to collaborate using just an email. On accepting the invitation, the developer sees the full project context and can begin work at once using the project’s Dev Environments—no need to spend time updating or reconfiguring their local machine with required tools, libraries, or other pre-requisites.

Existing members of an Amazon CodeCatalyst space, or new members using their email, can be invited to collaborate on a project:

Each will receive an invitation email containing a link titled Accept Invitation, which when clicked, opens a browser tab to sign in. Once signed in, they can view all the projects in the Amazon CodeCatalyst space they’ve been invited to and can also quickly switch to other spaces in which they are the owner or to which they’ve been invited.

From there, they can select a project and get an immediate overview of where things stand, for example, the status of recent workflows, any open pull requests, and available Dev Environments.

On the Issues board, team members can see which issues need to be worked on, select one, and get started.

Being able to immediately see the context for the project, and have access to on-demand cloud-based Dev Environments, all help with being able to start contributing more quickly, eliminating setup delays.

Get Started with Amazon CodeCatalyst in the Free Tier Today!
Blueprints to scaffold not just application code but also shared project resources supporting the development and deployment of applications, issue tracking, invite-by-email collaboration, automated workflows, and more are all available today in the newly released preview of Amazon CodeCatalyst to help accelerate your cloud development and delivery efforts. Learn more in the Amazon CodeCatalyst User Guide. And, as I mentioned earlier, additional blogs posts and other supporting content are planned by the team to dive into the range of features in more detail, so be sure to look out for them!

New — Create Point-to-Point Integrations Between Event Producers and Consumers with Amazon EventBridge Pipes | Amazon Web Services

It is increasingly common to use multiple cloud services as building blocks to assemble a modern event-driven application. Using purpose-built services to accomplish a particular task ensures developers get the best capabilities for their use case. However, communication between services can be difficult if they use different technologies to communicate, meaning that you need to learn the nuances of each service and how to integrate them with each other. We usually need to create integration code (or “glue” code) to connect and bridge communication between services. Writing glue code slows our velocity, increases the risk of bugs, and means we spend our time writing undifferentiated code rather than building better experiences for our customers.

Introducing Amazon EventBridge Pipes
Today, I’m excited to announce Amazon EventBridge Pipes, a new feature of Amazon EventBridge that makes it easier for you to build event-driven applications by providing a simple, consistent, and cost-effective way to create point-to-point integrations between event producers and consumers, removing the need to write undifferentiated glue code.

The simplest pipe consists of a source and a target. An optional filtering step allows only specific source events to flow into the Pipe and an optional enrichment step using AWS Lambda, AWS Step Functions, Amazon EventBridge API Destinations, or Amazon API Gateway enriches or transforms events before they reach the target. With Amazon EventBridge Pipes, you can integrate supported AWS and self-managed services as event producers and event consumers into your application in a simple, reliable, consistent and cost-effective way.

Amazon EventBridge Pipes bring the most popular features of Amazon EventBridge Event Bus, such as event filtering, integration with more than 14 AWS services, and automatic delivery retries.

How Amazon EventBridge Pipes Works
Amazon EventBridge Pipes provides you a seamless means of integrating supported AWS and self-managed services, favouring configuration over code. To start integrating services with EventBridge Pipes, you need to take the following steps:

  1. Choose a source that is producing your events. Supported sources include: Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Kinesis Data Streams, Amazon SQS, Amazon Managed Streaming for Apache Kafka, and Amazon MQ (both ActiveMQ and RabbitMQ).
  2. (Optional) Specify an event filter to only process events that match your filter (you’re not charged for events that are filtered out).
  3. (Optional) Transform and enrich your events using built-in free transformations, or AWS Lambda, AWS Step Functions, Amazon API Gateway, or EventBridge API Destinations to perform more advanced transformations and enrichments.
  4. Choose a target destination from more than 14 AWS services, including Amazon Step Functions, Kinesis Data Streams, AWS Lambda, and third-party APIs using EventBridge API destinations.

Amazon EventBridge Pipes provides simplicity to accelerate development velocity by reducing the time needed to learn the services and write integration code, to get reliable and consistent integration.

EventBridge Pipes also comes with additional features that can help in building event-driven applications. For example, with event filtering, Pipes helps event-driven applications become more cost-effective by only processing the events of interest.

Get Started with Amazon EventBridge Pipes
Let’s see how to get started with Amazon EventBridge Pipes. In this post, I will show how to integrate an Amazon SQS queue with AWS Step Functions using Amazon EventBridge Pipes.

The following screenshot is my existing Amazon SQS queue and AWS Step Functions state machine. In my case, I need to run the state machine for every event in the queue. To do so, I need to connect my SQS queue and Step Functions state machine with EventBridge Pipes.

First, I open the Amazon EventBridge console. In the navigation section, I select Pipes. Then I select Create pipe.

On this page, I can start configuring a pipe and set the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) permission, and I can navigate to the Pipe settings tab.

In the Permissions section, I can define a new IAM role for this pipe or use an existing role. To improve developer experience, the EventBridge Pipes console will figure out the IAM role for me, so I don’t need to manually configure required permissions and let EventBridge Pipes configures least-privilege permissions for IAM role. Since this is my first time creating a pipe, I select Create a new role for this specific resource.

Then, I go back to the Build pipe section. On this page, I can see the available event sources supported by EventBridge Pipes.

I select SQS and select my existing SQS queue. If I need to do batch processing, I can select Additional settings to start defining Batch size and Batch window. Then, I select Next.

On the next page, things get even more interesting because I can define Event filtering from the event source that I just selected. This step is optional, but the event filtering feature makes it easy for me to process events that only need to be processed by my event-driven application. In addition, this event filtering feature also helps me to be more cost-effective, as this pipe won’t process unnecessary events. For example, if I use Step Functions as the target, the event filtering will only execute events that match the filter.

I can use sample events from AWS events or define custom events. For example, I want to process events for returned purchased items with a value of 100 or more. The following is the sample event in JSON format:

{
   "event-type":"RETURN_PURCHASE",
   "value":100
}

Then, in the event pattern section, I can define the pattern by referring to the Content filtering in Amazon EventBridge event patterns documentation. I define the event pattern as follows:

{
   "event-type": ["RETURN_PURCHASE"],
   "value": [{
      "numeric": [">=", 100]
   }]
}

I can also test by selecting test pattern to make sure this event pattern will match the custom event I’m going to use. Once I’m confident that this is the event pattern that I want, I select Next.

In the next optional step, I can use an Enrichment that will augment, transform, or expand the event before sending the event to the target destination. This enrichment is useful when I need to enrich the event using an existing AWS Lambda function, or external SaaS API using the Destination API. Additionally, I can shape the event using the Enrichment Input Transformer.

The final step is to define a target for processing the events delivered by this pipe.

Here, I can select various AWS services supported by EventBridge Pipes.

I select my existing AWS Step Functions state machine, named pipes-statemachine.

In addition, I can also use Target Input Transformer by referring to the Transforming Amazon EventBridge target input documentation. For my case, I need to define a high priority for events going into this target. To do that, I define a sample custom event in Sample events/Event Payload and add the priority: HIGH in the Transformer section. Then in the Output section, I can see the final event to be passed to the target destination service. Then, I select Create pipe.

In less than a minute, my pipe was successfully created.

To test this pipe, I need to put an event into the Amaon SQS queue.

To check if my event is successfully processed by Step Functions, I can look into my state machine in Step Functions. On this page, I see my event is successfully processed.

I can also go to Amazon CloudWatch Logs to get more detailed logs.

Things to Know
Event Sources
– At launch, Amazon EventBridge Pipes supports the following services as event sources: Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Kinesis, Amazon Managed Streaming for Apache Kafka (Amazon MSK) alongside self-managed Apache Kafka, Amazon SQS (standard and FIFO), and Amazon MQ (both for ActiveMQ and RabbitMQ).

Event Targets – Amazon EventBridge Pipes supports 15 Amazon EventBridge targets, including AWS Lambda, Amazon API Gateway, Amazon SNS, Amazon SQS, and AWS Step Functions. To deliver events to any HTTPS endpoint, developers can use API destinations as the target.

Event Ordering – EventBridge Pipes maintains the ordering of events received from an event sources that support ordering when sending those events to a destination service.

Programmatic Access – You can also interact with Amazon EventBridge Pipes and create a pipe using AWS Command Line Interface (CLI), AWS CloudFormation, and AWS Cloud Development Kit (AWS CDK).

Independent Usage – EventBridge Pipes can be used separately from Amazon EventBridge bus and Amazon EventBridge Scheduler. This flexibility helps developers to define source events from supported AWS and self-managed services as event sources without Amazon EventBridge Event Bus.

Availability – Amazon EventBridge Pipes is now generally available in all AWS commercial Regions, with the exception of Asia Pacific (Hyderabad) and Europe (Zurich).

Visit the Amazon EventBridge Pipes page to learn more about this feature and understand the pricing. You can also visit the documentation page to learn more about how to get started.

Happy building!

— Donnie

Step Functions Distributed Map – A Serverless Solution for Large-Scale Parallel Data Processing | Amazon Web Services

I am excited to announce the availability of a distributed map for AWS Step Functions. This flow extends support for orchestrating large-scale parallel workloads such as the on-demand processing of semi-structured data.

Step Function’s map state executes the same processing steps for multiple entries in a dataset. The existing map state is limited to 40 parallel iterations at a time. This limit makes it challenging to scale data processing workloads to process thousands of items (or even more) in parallel. In order to achieve higher parallel processing prior to today, you had to implement complex workarounds to the existing map state component.

The new distributed map state allows you to write Step Functions to coordinate large-scale parallel workloads within your serverless applications. You can now iterate over millions of objects such as logs, images, or .csv files stored in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3). The new distributed map state can launch up to ten thousand parallel workflows to process data.

You can process data by composing any service API supported by Step Functions, but typically, you will invoke Lambda functions to process the data with code written in your favorite programming language.

Step Functions distributed map supports a maximum concurrency of up to 10,000 executions in parallel, which is well above the concurrency supported by many other AWS services. You can use the maximum concurrency feature of the distributed map to ensure that you do not exceed the concurrency of a downstream service. There are two factors to consider when working with other services. First, the maximum concurrency supported by the service for your account. Second, the burst and ramping rates, which determine how quickly you can achieve the maximum concurrency.

Let’s use Lambda as an example. Your functions’ concurrency is the number of instances that serve requests at a given time. The default maximum concurrency quota for Lambda is 1,000 per AWS Region. You can ask for an increase at any time. For an initial burst of traffic, your functions’ cumulative concurrency in a Region can reach an initial level of between 500 and 3000, which varies per Region. The burst concurrency quota applies to all your functions in the Region.

When using a distributed map, be sure to verify the quota on downstream services. Limit the distributed map maximum concurrency during your development, and plan for service quota increases accordingly.

To compare the new distributed map with the original map state flow, I created this table.

Original map state flow New distributed map flow
Sub workflows
  • Runs a sub-workflow for each item in an array. The array must be passed from the previous state.
  • Each iteration of the sub-workflow is called a map iteration, and its events are added to the state machine’s execution history.
  • Runs a sub-workflow for each item in an array or Amazon S3 dataset.
  • Each sub-workflow is run as a totally separate child execution, with its own event history.
Parallel branches Map iterations run in parallel, with an effective maximum concurrency of around 40 at a time. Can pass millions of items to multiple child executions, with concurrency of up to 10,000 executions at a time.
Input source Accepts only a JSON array as input. Accepts input as Amazon S3 object list, JSON arrays or files, csv files, or Amazon S3 inventory.
Payload 256 KB Each iteration receives a reference to a file (Amazon S3) or a single record from a file (state input). Actual file processing capability is limited by Lambda storage and memory.
Execution history 25,000 events Each iteration of the map state is a child execution, with up to 25,000 events each (express mode has no limit on execution history).

Sub-workflows within a distributed map work with both Standard workflows and the low-latency, short-duration Express Workflows.

This new capability is optimized to work with S3. I can configure the bucket and prefix where my data are stored directly from the distributed map configuration. The distributed map stops reading after 100 million items and supports JSON or csv files of up to 10GB.

When processing large files, think about downstream service capabilities. Let’s take Lambda again as an example. Each input—a file on S3, for example—must fit within the Lambda function execution environment in terms of temporary storage and memory. To make it easier to handle large files, Lambda Powertools for Python introduced a new streaming feature to fetch, transform, and process S3 objects with minimal memory footprint. This allows your Lambda functions to handle files larger than the size of their execution environment. To learn more about this new capability, check the Lambda Powertools documentation.

Let’s See It in Action
For this demo, I will create a workflow that processes one thousand dog images stored on S3. The images are already stored on S3.

➜  ~ aws s3 ls awsnewsblog-distributed-map/images/
2022-11-08 15:03:36      27034 n02085620_10074.jpg
2022-11-08 15:03:36      34458 n02085620_10131.jpg
2022-11-08 15:03:36      12883 n02085620_10621.jpg
2022-11-08 15:03:36      34910 n02085620_1073.jpg
...

➜  ~ aws s3 ls awsnewsblog-distributed-map/images/ | wc -l
    1000

The workflow and the S3 bucket must be in the same Region.

To get started, I navigate to the Step Functions page of the AWS Management Console and select Create state machine. On the next page, I choose to design my workflow using the visual editor. The distributed map works with Standard workflows, and I keep the default selection as-is. I select Next to enter the visual editor.

In the visual editor, I search and select the Map component on the left-side pane, and I drag it to the workflow area. On the right side, I configure the component. I choose Distributed as Processing mode and Amazon S3 as Item Source.

Distributed maps are natively integrated with S3. I enter the name of the bucket (awsnewsblog-distributed-map) and the prefix (images) where my images are stored.

On the Runtime Settings section, I choose Express for Child workflow type. I also may decide to restrict the Concurrency limit. It helps to ensure we operate within the concurrency quotas of the downstream services (Lambda in this demo) for a particular account or Region.

By default, the output of my sub-workflows will be aggregated as state output, up to 256KB. To process larger outputs, I may choose to Export map state results to Amazon S3.

Finally, I define what to do for each file. In this demo, I want to invoke a Lambda function for each file in the S3 bucket. The function exists already. I search for and select the Lambda invocation action on the left-side pane. I drag it to the distributed map component. Then, I use the right-side configuration panel to select the actual Lambda function to invoke: AWSNewsBlogDistributedMap in this example.

When I am done, I select Next. I select Next again on the Review generated code page (not shown here).

On the Specify state machine settings page, I enter a Name for my state machine and the IAM Permissions to run. Then, I select Create state machine.

Now I am ready to start the execution. On the State machine page, I select the new workflow and select Start execution. I can optionally enter a JSON document to pass to the workflow. In this demo, the workflow does not handle the input data. I leave it as-is, and I select Start execution.

During the execution of the workflow, I can monitor the progress. I observe the number of iterations, and the number of items successfully processed or in error.

I can drill down on one specific execution to see the details.

With just a few clicks, I created a large-scale and heavily parallel workflow able to handle a very large quantity of data.

Which AWS Service Should I Use
As often happens on AWS, you might observe an overlap between this new capability and existing services such as AWS Glue, Amazon EMR, or Amazon S3 Batch Operations. Let’s try to differentiate the use cases.

In my mental model, data scientists and data engineers use AWS Glue and EMR to process large amounts of data. On the other hand, application developers will use Step Functions to add serverless data processing into their applications. Step Functions is able to scale from zero quickly, which makes it a good fit for interactive workloads where customers may be waiting for the results. Finally, system administrators and IT operation teams are likely to use Amazon S3 Batch Operations for single-step IT automation operations such as copying, tagging, or changing permissions on billions of S3 objects.

Pricing and Availability
AWS Step Functions’ distributed map is generally available in the following ten AWS Regions: US East (Ohio, N. Virginia), US West (Oregon), Asia Pacific (Singapore, Sydney, Tokyo), Canada (Central), and Europe (Frankfurt, Ireland, Stockholm).

The pricing model for the existing inline map state does not change. For the new distributed map state, we charge one state transition per iteration. Pricing varies between Regions, and it starts at $0.025 per 1,000 state transitions. When you process your data using express workflows, you are also charged based on the number of requests for your workflow and its duration. Again, prices vary between Regions, but they start at $1.00 per 1 million requests and $0.06 per GB-hour (prorated to 100ms).

For the same amount of iterations, you will observe a cost reduction when using the combination of the distributed map and standard workflows compared to the existing inline map. When you use express workflows, expect the costs to stay the same for more value with the distributed map.

I am really excited to discover what you will build using this new capability and how it will unlock innovation. Go start to build highly parallel serverless data processing workflows today!

— seb

AWS Marketplace Vendor Insights – Simplify Third-Party Software Risk Assessments | Amazon Web Services

AWS Marketplace Vendor Insights is a new capability of AWS Marketplace. It simplifies third-party software risk assessments when procuring solutions from the AWS Marketplace.

It helps you to ensure that the third-party software continuously meets your industry standards by compiling security and compliance information, such as data privacy and residency, application security, and access control, in one consolidated dashboard.

As a security engineer, you may now complete third-party software risk assessment in a few days instead of months. You can now:

  • Quickly discover products in AWS Marketplace that meet your security and certification standards by searching for and accessing Vendor Insights profiles.
  • Access and download current and validated information, with evidence gathered from the vendors’ security tools and audit reports. Reports are available for download on AWS Artifact third-party reports (now available in preview).
  • Monitor your software’s security posture post-procurement and receive notifications for security and compliance events.

As a software vendor, you can now reduce the operational burden of responding to buyer requests for risk assessment information. It gives your customers a self-service access experience. You can now:

  • Build your product’s security profile by uploading your ISO 27001 or SOC2 Type 2 report and completing a software risk assessment with AWS Audit Manager.
  • Store and share your compliance reports such as ISO 27001 and SOC2 Type 2, using AWS Artifact third-party reports (preview).
  • View and approve your buyer requests for viewing security controls and compliance artifacts stored in Vendor Insights.

Let’s See It in Action
I want to procure a solution on the AWS Marketplace. But before purchasing the product, as a security engineer, I want to review its compliance. I navigate to the AWS Marketplace page of the AWS Management Console. I use the faceted search on the left side to select vendors that are ISO 27001 compliant.

I select a product. On the Product Overview page, I select View assessment data on the top right side (not shown on the screenshot). Then, I can see the overview page, which shows the Security certification received and the Expiration date.

I select the Security and compliance tab and see that I need to request access to see the detailed security and compliance information. I select the Request access button on the top right side to ask the vendor for access to their compliance documents.

On the next page, I fill in the Your information form with my details, and I select Request access.

The Next Steps section details what will happen next. The seller will contact me to sign a nondisclosure agreement (NDA). The seller will notify AWS Marketplace when the NDA is signed. Then, I will be granted access to Vendor Insights data.

The process can take a few days. For this demo, I switch to a fictional product—Everest—for which I have access to the compliance data. Here is the Security and compliance tab when my request for access is accepted.

The Summary section shows how many controls are available. It reports how many have been validated with evidence and how many have been self-reported by the seller. It also shows how many noncompliant controls are reported.

I can scroll down the page to see the details for multiple categories: Audit, compliance and security policy, Data security, Access management, Application security, Risk management and incident response, Business resiliency and continuity, End user device security, Infrastructure security, Human resources, and Security and configuration policy. The screenshot does not show all of them.

I select the detail for Access control and see the list under Control name. For each of them, I can see the compliance for SOC2 Type 2, ISO 27001, and the Vendor self-assessment.

I select the noncompliant one to get the details and the explanation the vendor provided.

If needed, I might also use AWS Artifact third-party reports (preview) to download the compliance reports.

For Software Vendors
As a software vendor, you can create a security profile for your SaaS products on AWS Marketplace and share this profile with your prospective and existing buyers. It helps you to reduce the manual work for engineering and security teams to respond to your customer questionnaires.

To create a security profile, you will need to complete a self-assessment using AWS Audit Manager on your marketplace management AWS account, share the current SOC2 Type II and ISO27001 compliance artifacts, if available, and turn on automated assessment using Audit Manager and AWS Config on your production AWS accounts.

Our team has created an AWS CloudFormation template to automate the onboarding steps. You can find the technical resources, such as the setup guide and the onboarding templates, on our GitHub repository. Once the profile is created, Vendor Insights will keep your security profile up to date by using automated evidence from Audit Manager and AWS Config. The updates to your profile are sent as notifications. Your security and compliance team can review the updates before they are shared with buyers.

With Vendor Insights, you manage access to your product’s security profile by approving the buyer’s subscription requests. When a buyer requests access, Vendor Insights shares their contact information over email to your compliance or deal-desk operations team. They can complete the NDA with the buyer and notify AWS Marketplace to grant the buyer access to your security profile. You can also request AWS Marketplace to revoke the buyer’s subscription on a later day if you don’t want to share your product’s security and compliance posture information with the buyer anymore.

The entire process is documented in the AWS Marketplace Vendor Insights seller guide.

Pricing and Availability
Vendor Insights is now available in all AWS Regions where AWS Marketplace is available.

The pricing model is very simple; there is no charge involved for using AWS Marketplace Vendor Insights.

For buyers, you can access and download assets during your procurement phase. You lose access to the Vendor Insights profile if you have not purchased the product after 60 days. When you purchase the product, you keep access to the product’s security profile for continuous monitoring of its compliance status.

For sellers, AWS Marketplace doesn’t charge to activate and use Vendor Insights. You will incur fees for using Audit Manager and AWS Config.

Go and start your risk assessments on the AWS Marketplace today.

— seb

New for Amazon SageMaker – Perform Shadow Tests to Compare Inference Performance Between ML Model Variants | Amazon Web Services

As you move your machine learning (ML) workloads into production, you need to continuously monitor your deployed models and iterate when you observe a deviation in your model performance. When you build a new model, you typically start validating the model offline using historical inference request data. But this data sometimes fails to account for current, real-world conditions. For example, new products might become trending that your product recommendation model hasn’t seen yet. Or, you experience a sudden spike in the volume of inference requests in production that you never exposed your model to before.

Today, I’m excited to announce Amazon SageMaker support for shadow testing!

Deploying a model in shadow mode lets you conduct a more holistic test by routing a copy of the live inference requests for a production model to the new (shadow) model. Yet, only the responses from the production model are returned to the calling application. Shadow testing helps you build further confidence in your model and catch potential configuration errors and performance issues before they impact end users. Once you complete a shadow test, you can use the deployment guardrails for SageMaker inference endpoints to safely update your model in production.

Get Started with Amazon SageMaker Shadow Testing
You can create shadow tests using the new SageMaker Inference Console and APIs. Shadow testing gives you a fully managed experience for setup, monitoring, viewing, and acting on the results of shadow tests. If you have existing workflows built around SageMaker endpoints, you can also deploy a model in shadow mode using the existing SageMaker Inference APIs.

On the SageMaker console, select Inference and Shadow tests to create, monitor, and deploy shadow tests.

To create a shadow test, select an existing (or create a new) SageMaker endpoint and production variant you want to test against.

Next, configure the proportion of traffic to send to the shadow variant, the comparison metrics you want to evaluate, and the duration of the test. You can also enable data capture for your production and shadow variant.

That’s it. SageMaker now automatically deploys the new variant in shadow mode and routes a copy of the inference requests to it in real time, all within the same endpoint. The following diagram illustrates this workflow.

Note that only the responses of the production variant are returned to the calling application. You can choose to either discard or log the responses of the shadow variant for offline comparison.

You can also use shadow testing to validate changes you made to any component in your production variant, including the serving container or ML instance. This can be useful when you’re upgrading to a new framework version of your serving container, applying patches, or if you want to make sure that there is no impact to latency or error rate due to this change. Similarly, if you consider moving to another ML instance type, for example, Amazon EC2 C7g instances based on AWS Graviton processors, or EC2 G5 instances powered by NVIDIA A10G Tensor Core GPUs, you can use shadow testing to evaluate the performance on production traffic prior to rollout.

You can monitor the progress of the shadow test and performance metrics such as latency and error rate through a live dashboard. On the SageMaker console, select Inference and Shadow tests, then select the shadow test you want to monitor.

If you decide to promote the shadow model to production, select Deploy shadow variant and define the infrastructure configuration to deploy the shadow variant.

You can also use the SageMaker deployment guardrails if you want to add linear or canary traffic shifting modes and auto rollbacks to your update.

Availability and Pricing
SageMaker support for shadow testing is available today in all AWS Regions where SageMaker hosting is available except for the AWS GovCloud (US) Regions and AWS China Regions.

There is no additional charge for SageMaker shadow testing other than usage charges for the ML instances and ML storage provisioned to host the shadow variant. The pricing for ML instances and ML storage dimensions is the same as the real-time inference option. There is no additional charge for data processed in and out of shadow deployments. The SageMaker pricing page has all the details.

To learn more, visit Amazon SageMaker shadow testing.

Start validating your new ML models with SageMaker shadow tests today!

— Antje